Fine Art Photography For Sale of Mexico

Collection

Cowgirls, Escaramuzas & Charras

Since being recognized in 1989 as an official part of the charrería, all-female escaramuza teams have become crowd favorites at competitions and exhibitions of this traditional Mexican sport.

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Collection

Mexican Graveyards

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Collection

People of Mexico

The heart of a nation is found in the soul of its people. To an outsider, it’s easy to mistakenly think that Mexico’s people are all equivalent. But Mexico is actually a diverse country with close to 100 unique indigenous groups and 350 dialects.

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Collection

Cowboys, Charro & Vaqueros

In Mexico, to be a charro is more than being able to ride a horse or put on the right clothes. It’s about maintaining a connection to the country’s storied past through the hundreds-year-old sports-art of charrería.

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Collection

Aztec Dancers

Although the Spanish “explorers” of the 16th century killed the native peoples they found in Mexico or enslaved them, even five centuries of colonization could never conquer their souls. Today, the ancient mitote steps of the Aztec dancers have been incorporated as an essential part of the Mexican Catholic procession.

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Collection

Places in Mexico

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Collection

Day of the Dead

At first glance, El Día de Muertos might appear to be a macabre and solemn festival for remembering the dead. But Mexico’s most famous holiday is a time for connecting with the past and uniting family, both here and gone.

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Collection

Catrinas on the Day of the Dead

The image of the catrina originated as a voice of popular criticism against Mexico’s 19th-century privileged class.  Today, the catrina is a unique part of the Mexican identity and on the Day of the Dead, some people dress up with black and white face paint and elegant clothes.

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Collection

La Catrina Photo Composite Series

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Collection

Landscapes

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Collection

The Masked Sayacas of Ajijic, Mexico

These cross-dressing, flour-throwing masked characters chase kids through the streets every Carnival, a tradition unique to the town of Ajijic, Mexico.

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